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30 High Fiber Foods to Improve Your Diet

Fiber is full of good stuff that is great for our overall health. But are you sure you are getting enough fiber in your diet? Studies have shown that only 5 percent of US adults and children get enough dietary fiber. 

So how can you boost the amount of fiber you get daily? It’s easy! Simply make sure you are getting enough food that contains high levels of fiber and you’ll be on your way to feeling fantastic! And if you want to give your overall health extra support, you can also try some of the great supplements from Orphic Nutrition range. 

Keep reading to find out exactly what fiber is, why it is so good for us, and how you can get all the fabulous health-supporting benefits of fiber just by making sure you eat the right foods.  

  • What Is Dietary Fiber Exactly?
  • Why Is Fiber Important for Your Diet?
  • How To Increase Fiber Intake in Your Diet
  • Other Ways to Support Your Digestive System

What Is Dietary Fiber Exactly?

Dietary fiber is sometimes called roughage or bulk. It is made up of plant material that our bodies can’t absorb or digest. As fiber passes throughout the systems, it leaves behind bacteria that work wonders for our gut health and our overall health. 

Fiber is classified as either soluble, meaning that it can dissolve in water, or insoluble, meaning that it does not dissolve in water. To stay in top shape, we should be eating foods that contain high levels of both types of fiber. 

Why Is Fiber Important for Your Diet?

Getting enough fiber is a crucial aspect of a healthy diet. Fiber helps us to maintain optimum gut health, keeps our bowels regularly, and helps our bodies to fight off diseases. A review found that a high-fiber diet drastically reduces a person’s chances of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. 

How To Increase Fiber Intake in Your Diet

It is recommended that men eat between 21 to 25 grams of fiber per day, while women should be eating 30 to 38 grams of fiber per day. (4) Depending on their age and sex, children should be eating between 19 and 38 grams of fiber a day. 

Luckily it is easy to boost your fiber intake just by eating enough of the right types of food. Here are the top high fiber foods that you should be including in your diet to improve your overall health:

Avocados: Loaded with nutrients and containing approximately 10 grams of fiber per avocado, these green fruits are a great addition to your diet.  (1) 

Navy beans: Baked beans and soups contain navy beans. You'll need about 1.5 cups of cooked navy beans to get the necessary 28 grams per day. Alternatively, add a little "extra" to your bean recipes by substituting navy beans for other types.  (2) 

Split peas: About 1.5 cups of cooked split peas provide the required daily fiber intake of 28 grams. Split peas can be used in a variety of ways besides soup. They also work well as a hummus-like spread or a curry dish's basis.  (3) 

Pinto beans: Pinto beans are a creamy, tasty bean that can be used to make refried beans or burritos. Pinto beans can also be used as a foundation for vegetable burgers. 2 cups cooked pinto beans will provide you with the daily fiber requirement.  (4) 

Kidney beans: Kidney beans are a favorite chili recipes because they keep their shape even when cooked for lengthy periods of time at high temperatures. Because one cup of kidney beans has 13.1 grams of fiber, you'll need roughly 2 cups to meet your daily fiber requirements. (5) 

Lentils: Lentils are incredibly versatile and can be used in stews, curries, salads, soups, and you can even make burgers from them! Best of all, lentils are loaded with fiber. (6)

Oatmeal: This traditional breakfast dish is a great source of fiber and contains 4 grams of fiber per cup. (7) 

Apples: An apple a day certainly will help you keep your fiber intake at an optimum level. A medium-sized raw apple has 4.4 grams of fiber. (8)

Bananas: As well as being high in Vitamin C and Vitamin B6, bananas have 2.6 grams of fiber per 100 grams. That’s about 3 grams of fiber in a medium-sized banana. (9)

Sweet Potatoes: Incredibly tasty and full of health-supporting vitamins, just one average-sized sweet potato has almost 4 grams of fiber. (10) 

Quinoa: Quinoa has recently become hugely popular with health-conscious foodies, and it’s not hard to see why. As well as its high nutrient levels, there are over 5 grams of fiber in every cup of cooked quinoa. (11)

Broccoli: If you really want to do what’s best for your health, then ramp up the amount of broccoli you eat! Broccoli is protein-dense, full of vitamins and antioxidants, and has 2.6 grams of fiber per 100 grams. (12) 

Dark Chocolate: If you are reading this list hoping for a sweet treat, then we’ve saved the best till last! Dark chocolate that is between 70 to 85 percent cacao has almost 11 grams of fiber per 100 grams. (13)

Brussels sprouts: In a brussels sprout slaw, these small cabbages can be boiled, grilled, pan fried, or sliced raw. With 4 grams of fiber per cup, 7 cups of brussels sprouts are required to meet the daily fiber requirement. (14)

Asparagus: Have you ever seen a platter with 83 asparagus spears on it? Unless it's a family-style meal, probably not. That's how many raw asparagus spears you'll need to meet your daily fiber requirement of 28 grams. Add thinly sliced raw asparagus spears to salads or sandwiches instead of steamed asparagus for a sweet, crisp flavor. (15)

Artichokes: Artichokes are wonderful on pizza, in a vegetable dip with spinach, or steamed to perfection. Can you eat four artichokes in one day, though? (16)

Acorn squash: Simply remove the stem, scoop out the seeds, and bake until the vegetables are soft. Alternatively, use wild rice, quinoa, or ground beef to stuff acorn squash. To meet your fiber objectives, you'll need roughly 3 cups of acorn squash. (17)

Green peas: With 9 grams of fiber per cup, go for larger servings to increase your fiber intake. To reach the daily recommended fiber intake, you'll need roughly 3 cups of green peas. Green peas are a tasty and nutritious source of iron, manganese, and vitamins A and C.. (18)

Turnip greens: Turnip greens have a moderate flavor and are high in beta carotene and vitamin K. They can be juiced or blended into green smoothies, just like spinach and other leafy greens. To meet your fiber objectives, you'll need roughly 5.5 cups of turnip greens. (19)

Carrots: Carrots that have been lightly steamed will release more beta carotene, but whether you eat them raw or cooked, you'll reap the advantages of the 4.68 grams of fiber in each cup. To get the daily recommended fiber intake, you'll need roughly 6 cups of carrots. (20)

Cauliflower: Riced cauliflower is a low-carb substitute for starchy vegetables that can be used to make pizza crust or chips. It's a terrific method to get more fiber in your diet, but it might not get you to the recommended 28 grams of fiber every day. That would entail consuming approximately 8.5 cups of cooked cauliflower on a daily basis.(21)

Strawberries: Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C as well. Add a couple slices to your next salad for added taste and fiber. It's possible you'll need to supplement with other high-fiber meals or pills like Metamucil—it takes around 6 cups of strawberries to fulfill the daily fiber recommendation of 28 grams. (22)

Raspberries: Two cups of raspberries each day will provide you with the daily fiber requirement. They're a delectable treat on their own, baked into a favorite dessert, or blended into a smoothie. (23)

Chia seeds: Chia seeds are a superfood that should be included in your diet. They're high in soluble fiber and can be used to thicken smoothies or as a crunchy topping for yogurt. There are 4 grams of fiber in each tablespoon.. (24)

Barley: Is your winter barley consumption limited to a few bowls of soup? You may get your daily fiber recommendation by eating about 2 cups of boiled barley every day. More of this delicate, chewy high-fiber grain can be added to roasted veggies or used as a pilaf. (25)

Almonds: A pound of 1 oz. Almonds have 3 grams of fiber per serving. To add crispy, delicious fiber to cooked veggies or meals, sprinkle some on top. To meet your daily fiber requirement, you'll need around 1 cup of almonds. Almond butter and almond milk both have fiber, but almond milk doesn't. (26)

Peanuts: Your favorite PB&J isn't just a comfort food; it's also a wonderful source of fiber, especially when made with whole grain bread. To get to 28 grams, you'll need around 1 cup of roasted, unsalted peanuts. (27)

Walnuts: Walnuts, which are known for their heart-healthy omega-3 fats, can also help you meet your fiber targets if you consume roughly 2 cups per day. Blend some into your smoothie or sprinkle on cereals and salads. (28)

Soybeans: They have a low fiber content compared to other beans, with only 7.5 grams of fiber per cup. To meet the daily fiber recommendation, you'll need roughly 3.5 cups of cooked soybeans.(29)

Popcorn: Although air-popped popcorn is a nutritious snack, it will take 1.5 liters of popcorn to meet the daily fiber requirement. For a cheese flavor, add a sprinkle of nutritional yeast, or experiment with your favorite herbs and spices.(30)

High Fiber Foods Chart

 Food Serving Size  Fiber Content 
Asparagus 83 asparagus spears 28 grams
Strawberries 6 cups of strawberries 28 grams
Peanuts 1 cup of roasted peanuts 28 grams
Cauliflower 8 cups of cooked cauliflower 28 grams
Navy beans 1 cup of cooked beans 19 grams
Split peas 1 cup of cooked split peas 19 grams
Barley 1 cup of boiled barley 17.3 grams
Lentils 1 cups of boiled lentils 16 grams
Kidney Beans 2 cups of kidney beans 13.1 grams
Popcorn 100 grams 13 grams
Dark chocolate 100 grams of dark chocolate 11 grams
Broccoli 100 grams of broccoli 2.6 grams
Dark chocolate 100 grams of dark chocolate 11 grams
Avocado One avocado 10 grams
Green peas 1 cup of green peas 9 grams
Pinto beans 2 cups of cooked pinto beans 8.8 grams
Acorn squash 1 cup cubed acorn squash 2.1 grams
Green peas 1 cup of green peas 9 grams
Raspberries 1 cup of raspberries 8 grams
Soybeans 1 cup soybeans 7.5 grams
Walnuts 1 cup of shelled walnuts 7 grams
Strawberries 6 cups of strawberries 28 grams
Raspberries 1 cup of raspberries 8 grams
Artichokes 100 grams of artichokes 5 grams
Quinoa 1 cup of cooked quinoa 5 grams
Apple 1 medium-sized raw apple 4.4 grams
Chia seeds 1 tablesppon of chia seeds 4 grams
Brussels sprouts 1 cup of brussel sprouts 4 grams
Sweet Potato 1 average-sized 4 grams
Oatmeal 1 cup of cooked oatmeal 4 grams
Turnip greens 100 grams of turnip greens 3.2 grams
Almonds 1 oz of almonds 3 grams
Carrots 100 grams of carrots 2.8 grams
Broccoli 100 grams of broccoli 2.6 grams
Banana 100 grams of banana 2.6 grams
Acorn squash 1 cup cubed acorn squash 2.1 grams

Other Ways to Support Your Digestive System

If you include all the above foods into your regular meals then you’ll definitely increase the amount of fiber you eat, which will help your body to stay healthy and is great for your digestive system.  

You can give your tummy a little more help by trying some of the health supplements from Orphic Nutrition.* The probiotics in our Apple Cider Vinegar Capsules and our Digestive Enzymes work to support the digestive system.* (16) Other products such as our Omega 3 Fish Oil Capsules or our Turmeric Curcumin with Bioperine supplements can help support the body's healthy inflammatory response. 

Take a look at the awesome range of health-supporting supplements on offer at Orphic Nutrition today! Please note: Before taking any course of supplements, we always recommend getting advice from a medical professional.